Songs for Fall

If you’re in a situation where you’re not able to use much holiday-oriented repertoire, this post is for you! In the past, Halloween songs have been frowned upon at my school, so I don’t introduce songs about witches, ghosts, or goblins. However, I always fall back on some fall favorites like Skin and Bones, Let’s Hide the Pumpkin, and Pumpkin, Pumpkin, Round and Fat.

Although Pumpkin, Pumpkin, Round and Fat uses the word “jack-o-lantern,” I have been able to use it without complaint. I hope you can, too, because it’s a wonderful way to begin improvisation, even in Kindergarten. The first time I introduce the song, I sing it and allow the students to just listen. (They start singing when they’re ready.)

1. One student stands in front of the class and holds a pumpkin face on a stick. During the song the face is toward them. At the end, they turn it to their classmates and the other students have to try to make that face. (I made 5 faces from paper plates.)

2. The next week, a student stands in front of the class and makes their own face. The students copy it.

3. For another variation on this game, see the Music a la Abbott blog. (You should be following Amy’s blog anyway. It’s full of great ideas!)

More on improvisation next time!

Tongo – Polynesian Canoe Song

This awesome folk song has multiple uses. Its pentatonic range of low la up to la (la, do re mi so la) allows teachers to use it with multiple grade levels. The syncopated rhythms and dotted quarter note and eighth note rhythms make it engaging for upper elementary as well. The call and response format makes it very easy for students to learn. Finally, the opportunity for improvisation makes it a winner. Let’s dig in!

For the game, my students sit in long rows of equal length, as if they’re sitting in canoes. After singing the song, I clap a four beat pattern and they echo me. Actually, I do four different four beat patterns and they echo each one. Then I immediately sing the song again. By teaching them not to talk after each “set,” I’m also building good classroom management habits.

After we’ve tried this a few times, the head of each canoe chooses an unpitched instrument. During the final phrase of the song, they stand and face their row. They improvise four beat patterns and their row/canoe claps back the four beat patterns. Be prepared for a bit of chaos the first time. The students have to get used to listening for just their leader’s instrument and the four beat patterns. My student teacher made a sign that said, “Play” with four hearts under the word. She stood at the back of the canoes and pointed to the beats while the leaders were supposed to improvise their patterns. It helped the “leaders” stay together. When the song begins again, they should hand their instrument to the next person and walk to the back of the canoe.

Another helpful tip: Clap some patterns for the students while singing phrases that match such as, “Doggie, Doggie, where’s your bone?” “My paddle’s keen and bright” “Rain, Rain, go away” etc. so they get some ideas and realize they can use rhythms from songs they already know.

Eventually, ask your class who would like to be the singing leader. You’ll be surprised and delighted to hear your students take over. The full song with lyrics is also available under Resources for Teachers near the bottom with full lyrics. Tongo in F